5 etiquette rules in Japan when you get on a taxi for your business ?

If you work in Japan, you should know Japanese business etiquette when you get on a taxi.
Which seat do you know you should take depending on your position ? I will introduce 5 etiquette rules in Japan when you get on a taxi for your business.

1. Subordinate or the youngest person should stop a taxi

Japanese business etiquette starts before you get on a taxi. If you are subordinate or the youngest, you should stop a taxi for your bosses, elderly people or customers. You should call a taxi ahead if you already know when you get on the taxi. You should be careful not to stop or call a taxi too early so that a taxi driver doesn’t wait for a long time,

2. Subordinate or the youngest person should put luggage on a carboot

If you have big luggage and suitcases, a subordinate or the youngest person should put them on the carboot.

3. Seats you should take are decided depending on your positions

The higher position the person has or the older the person is, the lower the number of seats he should take in the following figure. Subordinate or the youngest person should take the seat next to the driver and tell your destination to the driver. And they should get on a taxi in the end.
The seat behind a driver is the safest even if a traffic accident happens, so it’s said that the person who has the highest position and is the oldest should take this seat. On the contrary the seat next to the driver is the most dangerous, so it’s said that a subordinate or the youngest person should take this seat.

4. Subordinate or the youngest person should settle a bill

If you reach your destination, the subordinate or the youngest person should settle a bill. While they settle a bill, they get bosses or older people get off a taxi.

5. Subordinate or the youngest person should check if someone forgets something and take down luggage from the carboot

Some drives take down your baggage, but if they don’t do that subordinate or the youngest person should do that.

Although I wrote about Japanese business etiquette when you get on a taxi, recently some people don’t mind if you don’t follow these rules.
But if you want to work in Japan you should know there is this business etiquette.

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